It never really ends: the Permanent Resident Card


Permanent Resident CardOn Thursday I finally broke down and attempted to call the immigration call centre because I was concerned that my permanent resident card had not yet arrived.  While it’s not strictly required, it’s prima facie evidence that I’ve successfully become a permanent resident of Canada.

I’ve read stories about how people cannot get through to an agent and thus was not surprised when after going through 60 seconds of voice prompts and listening to admonishments that the agents would not tolerate foul or abusive language that I was told they were too busy and was disconnected.  I tried again a number of times with similar results.  I’ve never been a big fan of the telephone as a means of transferring information – as I like to say “it’s worth the paper on which it is written.”

Friday morning I decided to try once again and was pleasantly surprised when my call was placed in queue for being answered.  After waiting about five minutes I spoke with an agent, explained the situation and she agreed with my assessment that I should have received my PR card – published processing time is 58 calendar days and I’m coming up on three months.  She collected various bits of information from me, ostensibly to confirm my identity, though I am never sure why using public record information really does anything about authenticating someone.  But I digress.

She then placed me on hold for several minutes and upon her return she explained to me that while my card had indeed been produced, there was an issue with my paperwork and it would require that I submit an additional form requesting correction of my “Confirmation of Permanent Residency” document – something about a missing date.  She advised me they were sending out the card that very day and would also be sending me a letter telling me of the issue with respect to the landing paperwork.  She also then e-mailed me a link to the form I would need to correct the error.

I’ve gone over my copy of the COPR and I cannot find an error similar to what she described (apparently something about a date) but it does remind me that when I landed the border officer did try to give me the wrong copy back – so now I wonder if he omitted a date on the copy he kept.

I suppose the lesson here is that the adventure never really ends.

Epilogue

This morning (20 January) after traveling all day yesterday – up at 1:45 am PT and finally home at 9:30 pm PT, I found a string of comments on this post from objecting to my linking to their blog and the image on their blog post – a post that’s almost 8 years old at this point and to images that are still publicly accessible.  From the tone it sounds like they objected to the content of my blog and the fact that I didn’t remove the links quickly enough for their taste.  Sadly that sort of intolerance still seems to happen, even in a progressive country like Canada.

Thus, I’ve changed it to a different sample card and point to a different immigration blog – and like I did before using the previous image, I’ve sent a note to the registered owner of the domain advising them that I am going to link to their image. There’s this interesting issue with images: some people don’t like hot linking to them while others don’t like it if you create a separate cached copy – there’s no “right” answer.  But in either case the net effect for anyone viewing the page is the same – a copy of that image ends up on your computer, in your browser cache.   I’ve not really worried too much about it as my own blog’s following is rather small.  But just for the record, in this case, the original post material came from a US-based server and thus the use of their posted material is subject to the US Copyright “Fair Use” Doctrine. I’m confident that I fell well within the Fair Use doctrine.

Of course, I’m not in favour of allowing bigotry, but it just isn’t possible to fight every battle – you’ll leave yourself exhausted.  So the first thing I did after turning on the computer and reading this tirade is give them what they wanted – to not be associated with my own story, presumably because they found it morally repugnant.  Of course, the original image is still publicly available and it and the blog post still come up at the top of a Google image search.

Oh, and in case it matters, my own permanent resident card was delivered while I was gone.

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