Lee v MCI


MP Jason Kenney of the Conservative Party fiel...

Citizenship and Immigration Canada has been doing some major revisions to their website of late.  One area in which things are more interestingly laid out is the area dealing with medical issues, in particular, medical inadmissibility due to excessive demand.

I’m familiar with most of these cases, but I’d never reviewed the oldest of them: Lee v MCI.

Why is this important?  Because in the Lee decision, the court overturned the refusal because the officer failed to consider the applicant‘s request for a Temporary Resident Permit (TRP).  That request was a bit informal from what the record indicates.  Yet it reminded me that in our own original response to the visa office we asked they consider a TRP.  This was never addressed by the visa officer, nor was it raised in the application for leave and Judicial Review we filed.  In my case it didn’t matter (we obtained leave anyway) but it’s important for people going through this process to keep in mind they do have the option to request they be granted a TRP and to raise this as an issue in any legal challenge, as there is case law on-point here.

So if an officer has a concern about something in your plan – for example, perhaps she or he isn’t sure your insurance will cover the cost of prescription drugs – rather than blanket refusing you, she or he could grant a TRP for a period of time, say six to twelve months, with the understanding that in that time the applicant should be able to confirm that the insurance plan is working as intended.

Or let’s revisit Companioni – where the judge was concerned that their plan was inchoate.  To create a viable plan essentially required they be in Canada – after all, even my own plan was viable only because I was already in Canada.  Everything was set up and ready to go.  So to get out of the “chicken and egg” issue here, a TRP could allow someone to come to Canada for a short period of time – a year, for example – and set things up so she or he could show that they really wouldn’t be a burden.

After a year, the applicant could go back and apply for an extension, pointing out that the plan is working and the applicant is not a burden.  If that’s the case, the TRP can be extended again.

After three years of this, the applicant becomes eligible for permanent residency as a member of the “permit holder’s class“.  The medical inadmissibility concern is no longer an issue to CIC – but an officer had two opportunities to review the file and verify that the applicant really was complying with the terms and conditions of the application.

This underscores one more approach that a motivated applicant can pursue.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s