Rashid v MCI


This truly is a process that encourages one to scream at times.  I’m reading various cases (this time, using the fabulous search tools at the Canadian Legal Information Institute. I’m finding their linkage tools (“find cases that cite this case”) to be invaluable.

Of course, the downside to this is that I’m likely torturing myself through this process.  Because in this case (Rashid v MCI)  the applicant‘s application was rejected.  A careful reading of the logic suggests that it could be applied to my case.

The judge did certify a question in this case, one that had it been answered would likely have direct bearing upon my case:

When a medical officer has determined that an applicant will be in need of prescription drugs, the cost of which would place the applicant over the threshold of “excessive demand” as set out in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations, must a visa officer assess the applicant’s ability to pay for the prescription drugs privately when those same drugs are covered by a government program for which the applicant would be eligible in the province/territory of intended residence?

This question directly squares with my own situation. Rashid however failed because he did not already have the necessary insurance in place.  Thus, interpreting the current jurisprudence it would seem that in order to be successful proving an insurance based plan to mitigate excessive demand one would have to already be inside Canada and the insurance must already be in place.

The CIC medical officer in my case added an additional requirement: one must already be using the insurance, in order to assuage her (after the fact) concerns that the insurance truly will pay the prospective costs.

Indeed, it is this continual raising of the bar that makes me grudgingly question if this isn’t really not about procedural fairness but rather more about “let’s just make it difficult for anyone ‘undesirable’ to immigrate to Canada.”  Frankly, very few people will take their case to the Federal Court of Canada in a case like this.  I suspect that most abandon their case at the point they get the fairness letter.  “Oh well, we didn’t make it.”  Some respond and of them a few actually work with an experienced attorney to craft an intelligible response.  At that point, how many people will continue to challenge the system?

Finally, even if they are successful at challenging the system, what do they win?  After all, their application is just sent back to CIC for consideration by another officer.  From what I can tell, that doesn’t seem to be successful in most cases anyway.

Is there any wonder that this really looks more like a scheme to provide the veneer of respectability over what is, at its heart, primarily based upon bias?

I just hope that I’m wrong.

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Silence can be deafening


Silence SpeaksWell it’s now evening on Wednesday.  My attorney presumably returned from vacation yesterday and yet, two days later, I’ve heard nothing from him with respect to the odd filings I mentioned previously.

I try hard not to make myself a pest – I did send two e-mails, and I thought that I would hear from him upon his return. While I’m sure he had other matters awaiting his attention when he got back, I don’t expect he has a large number of pending judicial review applications before the Federal Court of Canada – he does seem to argue one or two per year.

Maybe I’m just being impatient.  For him this is just one case of many – it’s a job for him.  For me it is admittedly a bit of an obsession, but then again it is my life here.  I’ve pointed out that three plus years is a long time for anyone to put their life on hold awaiting the outcome of a bureaucratic process.  I have also pointed out previously how dehumanizing this process is, so perhaps this is just another reflection of that reality.

At any rate, now I wait.  In one week the next deadline is upon us – the Government’s deadline for filing any additional affidavits.  I’m not sure if they will submit anything.  Next month will be deadlines for additional legal briefs to be filed.  If there are any potential parties wishing to intervene on either side, that would be the point at which they would do so.

So I shall sit here and wait and try to enjoy the silence.

Deadlines


Today I decided to really look further into the case law around tribunal records.  In the process I got side tracked by noticing Immigration Rule 21(2):

No time limit prescribed by these Rules may be varied except by order of a judge or prothonotary.

So my distraction turned into a bit of a search for case law regarding the meaning of the rules around the strict timelines laid down by the Federal Court of Canada.  Why is this important?  If the response is not timely and the Court does not grant an order then the material is excluded from consideration.

I also noticed another time issue: the “certified tribunal record” includes material that is dated AFTER the original decision, which runs counter to CIC’s own rules – the tribunal record should only include information/material that was considered by the decision maker.  Interestingly, if the extra material had been present in December 2011, the visa officer should have reached a positive determination, since it indicates I am not medically inadmissible (a code of “M39” which means “medically admissible – excessive demand exempt, will require health and/or social services”).

One might think that a single day doesn’t really matter – but it does.  It could be easily overcome by filing an application with the Court, asking for the change in schedule to be allowed and explaining why the extension is justified.  Indeed, I read a case in which the attorney delivered the application to the Bailiff for service on the day the service was due but the Bailiff did not serve the papers until the subsequent day.  The court did not consider the application record because it was not served in a timely fashion and the Applicant’s counsel did not ask for an extension of time to file.

I have seen signs of game playing in civil litigation before, so I shouldn’t be surprised at these shenanigans, but it is a bit shocking when it is my case to which they are being applied.

Then again, it makes me wonder: if the government had a strong case here, why would they play these games.  This really does suggest they expect to lose.  In some ways, having the Court strike down 38(1)(c) might be a blessing for the government because it would get them out of the medical inadmissibility business, which does seem to create a lot of grief for them.

We will know on or after October 17, 2012. I don’t see that deadline changing.